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LSAT Preparation

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Registering for the LSAT

At this time, the LSAT is offered roughly 8 times a year. In determining which date to select, there are several factors to consider. The most critical factor is the application windows of all the schools to which you plan to apply. The application window is the period between the date that the law school will begin accepting applications and the last date it will accept applications. This window is critical, and more important than the application deadline, because law school admissions as well as financial aid awards are considered on a rolling basis. In other words, the applicant who Read More +



The LSAT Exam Explained

NOTE: The information below refers to the in-person LSAT which, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, has been suspended indefinitely. In its place, LSAC now administers the virtual LSAT-Flex, an online version of the LSAT that prospective law students take at home. Each test taker is paired with a remote proctor who monitors the test-taking environment before and during the test. Because of proctoring issues and other considerations, the LSAT-Flex is significantly shorter than the in-person LSAT. Rather than four 35-minute sections, the LSAT-Flex includes only three 35-minute sections, one each of Logical Reasoning, Reading Comprehension, and Analytical Reasoning (Logic Games). Read More +



LSAT Test Costs and Fees

Taking the LSAT and applying to law school is not an inexpensive endeavor. In addition to the fee that the Law School Admission Council (LSAC) charges for registering for the LSAT test, there are significant costs associated with preparing for the exam. The good news is that you may be able to get some of these costs reduced. Currently, the "basic fee" for taking the LSAT is $200. However, there are several potential "auxiliary" fees. For example, if you need to change your test date or test location, you will have to pay an additional $125. Visit LSAC.org for a Read More +



LSAT Overview

NOTE: The information below refers to the in-person LSAT which, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, has been suspended indefinitely. In its place, LSAC now administers the virtual LSAT-Flex, an online version of the LSAT that prospective law students take at home. Each test taker is paired with a remote proctor who monitors the test-taking environment before and during the test. Because of proctoring issues and other considerations, the LSAT-Flex is significantly shorter than the in-person LSAT. Rather than four 35-minute sections, the LSAT-Flex includes only three 35-minute sections, one each of Logical Reasoning, Reading Comprehension, and Analytical Reasoning (Logic Games). Read More +



A Guide to Free LSAT Preparation

LSAT Prep can be quite expensive. Live LSAT prep classes from popular test prep companies such as Kaplan or Princeton Review range in price from $1500-$2500, while many online LSAT courses can be up to $800. Simply purchasing LSAT study guide books for self study can also be expensive as a book or a series of books will cost anywhere from $40 to over $300. However, by doing some research and being a little creative, it is possible to find free LSAT prep materials. Here are a few ideas. Law School Admissions Council The Law School Admissions Council's (LSAC) Read More +



LSAT-Flex FAQs

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the Law School Admissions Council (LSAC) suspended in-person LSATs and began offering the LSAT-Flex, an online version of the LSAT that prospective law students take at home. Each test taker is paired with a remote proctor who monitors the test-taking environment before and during the test. Is the format of the test different than the in-person LSAT? Yes. Because of proctoring issues and other considerations, the LSAT-Flex is significantly shorter than the in-person LSAT. Rather than four 35-minute sections, the LSAT-Flex includes only three 35-minute sections, one each of Logical Reasoning, Reading Comprehension, and Analytical Reasoning Read More +



The Top 10 LSAT Tips

LSAT Tip #1: Take the LSAT Early. The best time to take the LSAT is in February or June of the year prior to when you plan to enter law school. Many law schools accept applications beginning in early December and ending in February or March, and make admissions decisions on a rolling basis. Law schools will receive February and June LSAT scores early in the admission process, increasing your changes of being accepted. LSAT Tip #2: Prepare Early. It is best to start test preparation 8-12 weeks prior to the test date. This is not a college exam, so Read More +